Calosoma (Calodrepa) wilcoxi LeConte, 1848

Calosoma Wilcoxi LeConte, 1848: 446 (described: a Nov Eboraco = New York, ad Texas); syntypes in Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Ma. (https://mczbase.mcz.harvard.edu/)
Calosoma wilcoxi Breuning, 1927: 165
Calosoma (Calodrepa) wilcoxi Lapouge, 1932: 405
Calodrepa wilcoxi Jeannel, 1940: 78
Calosoma (Calodrepa) wilcoxi Gidaspow, 1959: 251
Calosoma (Calosoma) wilcoxi Erwin, 2007: 107

Length 17-22 mm. C. wilcoxi has, on average, smaller dimensions when compared to all the other species collected into Calodrepa. At first glance it looks a small C. scrutator, because of the body shape and color, but it is easily recognized because it is the only species of the group that has the metatrochanters bearing a seta and that has straight, or at most slightly arcuate, male mesotibiae.
Two aberrant specimens of C. wilcoxi, having the upperbody dark blue-black instead of the typical metallic green. were collected in Texas, McLennan County, and published by Ray & al. (2016).
According to Gidaspow (1959: 251) and Erwin (2007: 107), C. wilcoxi ranges across most of the United States from the Atlantic coast to California but it is more abundant in the eastern states. It is found in Ontario and Quebec (in this last case probably only it as an occasional visitor) down to Texas, but it has never been recorded from Mexico, and its presence in California is considered unlikely by Bosquet, (2012: 230).
C. wilcoxi was imported into Hawaii, as a potential agents of biological control. As a result, it could now be considered part of the entomological fauna of the Islands along with other imported American species: C. frigidum, C. calidum, C. semilaeve, C. simplex, C. peregrinator, C. marginale (http://www2.bishopmuseum.org /HBS/checklist).

Examined specimens and literature’s data
Canada. Ontario: Toronto (www.inaturalist.org/obs/12972148), Prince Edward County, Ottawa, Point Pelee National Park (Lindroth, 1961: 47), Leamington (BIOUG), Rouge Park (UASM), Murphys Point (www.gbif.org); Quebec: Aylmer (Lindroth, 1961: 47).
United States. Alabama: Boaz (www.gbif.org/); Arkansas: Jonesboro (www.inaturalist.org/obs/32076449); California: Tulare co. (Burgess & Collins, 1917: 39); Connecticut, Delaware (Burgess & Collins, 1917: 38); District of Columbia: Washington (Burgess & Collins, 1917: 39); Georgia (Burgess & Collins, 1917: 38); Illinois: Peoria county, Peoria (EM, SB), McDonough county, Macomb (UASM), Jackson county, Carbondale (OSUC), Champaign County (http://bugguide.net/); Indiana: Evansville (www.inaturalist.org/obs/13683860); Iowa (Burgess & Collins, 1917: 38); Kansas: Crawford, 3 mi NE Pittsburg (SEMC), Johnson County (http://bugguide.net/); Kentucky: Rockcastle Co. (OSUC), Christian county (UASM); Louisiana: Saint John the Baptist Parish, Saint Tammany Parish (Bousquet, 2012: 232); Maine (Bousquet, 2012: 232); Maryland: Allegany county, 2ml W Pawlings (EM), Mongomery co. (https://bugguide.net/), Dorchester Co., Baltimore City (www.marylandbiodiversity.com), Cove Point (http://www.covepoint-trust.org/); Massachussets (Burgess & Collins, 1917: 38); Michigan: Washtenaw Co., Ann Arbor (OSUC); Missouri: Columbia (EM), Taney Co., Branson (OSUC); Minnesota, Mississipi (Bousquet, 2012: 232); Nebraska: Namaha county, Brownville (SB), Sarpy county, Bellevue (SB), Lincoln (EM); New Hampshire: Rockingham county (Bousquet, 2012: 232); New Jersey: Atlantic Co., Atlantic City (OSUC); New York: Suffolk county, East Hampton, Long Island (EM), Cape May Co., (OSUC), Queens County (http://bugguide.net/); New Mexico: Cibola County (http://bugguide.net/); North Carolina: Belmont, Jordan Lake (www.gbif.org/); North Dakota (Bosquet, 2012: 232); Ohio: Lake Co., Mentor (OSUC), Hamilton Co. (OSUC), Adams Co. (OSUC), Wayne Co. (OSUC), Clifton (OSUC), Columbus (OSUC), Franklin Co., Blendon Twp. (OSUC), Delaware Co. (OSUC), Ashtabula Co., Ashtabula, (OSUC); Oklahoma: Pontotoc County (http://bugguide.net/); Pennsylvania: Forest Hills (www.inaturalist.org/obs/2876336); Rhode Island (Burgess & Collins, 1917: 38); South Carolina: Irmo (www.inaturalist.org/obs/11429332), South Dakota (Bosquet, 2012: 232); Tennessee: Lake county, Reelfoot Lake (UASM), Chester County, (http://bugguide.net/); Texas: Brazora county (Bousquet, 2012: 232); Brazos county, College Station, (OSUC, SB), Brown County, Travis County, (http://bugguide.net/), McLennan County (Ray & al., 2016); Utah: Gunnison Butte (www.gbif.org/); Virginia: Richmond, Bryan Park (SEMC); Washington, DCA (UASM); West Virginia, Morgan County (http://bugguide.net/); Wisconsin: Lafayette County (http://bugguide.net/), La Crosse, Racine, Richland, Winnebago (Messer, 2009: 33).

Notes: Winged, it is attracted to light at night but it is diurnal as well, and it is not rare to observe large gathering of adults feeding upon species of Geometrid caterpillar.
Most of the active individuals were captured from April to June, that is also the coupling period. Any way, according with local climate, C. wilcoxi seems to be active all year round, while in the northern areas, it may happen to find adults overwintering in small cavities in the ground.
There is no explicit dedication of this species and it is difficult to identify the person which the name “Wilcoxi” refers to. However, in other publications of the author, there are some references to a “Mr. Wilcox” who gave him various beetles of Illinois.
A brief description of larval stages can be found in Burgess & Collins (1917: 41).

Calosoma (Calodrepa) wilcoxi
LeConte, 1848
United States: Texas, Brazos county, College Station, 10 april 78
Calosoma (Calodrepa) wilcoxi
LeConte, 1848
United States: Texas, Brazos county, College Station, 10 april 78
Calosoma (Calodrepa) wilcoxi
LeConte, 1848
United States: Texas, McLennan County, Waco, Baylor University Campus, April 1, 2012 (coll. Matthias Seidel)
Calosoma (Calodrepa) wilcoxi
LeConte, 1848
United States: Texas, McLennan County, Waco, Baylor University Campus, April 1, 2012 (coll. Matthias Seidel)
updated Sept. 16 2019

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