Calosoma (Carabomimus) digueti Lapouge, 1924

Length 22-25 mm. Lapouge (1924: 39) described an alleged population of C. depressicolle, from the uplands of the state of Jalisco, South of Guadalajara, (C. depressicolle var. digueti). Later on, this population has been considered by Jeannel (1940: 224) as a distinct species.
C. digueti appears a species strongly related to C. depressicolle and to C. flohri, considering the model of the male genitalia and the general shape of the body.
However, it has a less transverse pronotum with distinctly sinuate rear sides and differs from C. depressicolle because of the particular form of the apex of the penis which has a characteristic angular apophysis projecting on the left edge, that is very similar to the one of C. flohri, except it is less developed, and the scourge of its ligule is longer, and it differs from C. flohri because of the lack of punctures on pronotum.
The color of the upper body, as in related species, is black.
Lassalle (2009) and Lassalle & van den Berghe (2011b) have recently attributed to C. digueti some populations of southern Jalisco, that were previously considered to belong to C flohri. These populations, having a stronger sculpture of the elytra that the typical C. digueti, on closer examination are distinguished from C. flohri because of the unmistakable shape of apex of aedeagus and lack of punctures on pronotum.
Finally there is the case of C. cicatricosum hoegei described by Breuning (1928b: 53) from Guadalajara and which Jeannel (1940: 226) attributed to C. laevigatum apparently without regard to the original description, in which it is stressed that the elytral sculpture is characterized by deep foveae. Only recently Lassalle & van den Berghe (2011) attributed hoegei to C. digueti as subspecies. In this hypothesis, hoegei could represent the extreme development of the model of elytral sculpture that characterizes C. digueti.
It would seem that in the case of C. digueti, as in C. flohri, the sculpture of the elytra varies from locality and locality, instead, the disk of pronotum remains always smooth, as in C. depressicolle
Therefore, at this state of knowledge and taking into account the limited objectives of this presentation, is perhaps better to consider C. digueti as a complex of populations to be collected in few subspecies in which predominates one or the other model of elytral sculpture.


Calosoma (Carabomimus) digueti digueti Lapouge, 1924

Eutelodontum depressicolle Digueti, Lapouge, 1924: 39 (lectotype: Jalisco, Huejotitan; Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris)
Calosoma (Blaptosoma) blaptoides ssp. digueti, Breuning, 1928: 55
Blaptosoma (Eutelodontum) blaptoides digueti, Lapouge, 1932: 391
Carabomimus digueti, Jeannel, 1940: 224
Calosoma (Carabomimus) digueti, Gidaspow, 1959: 293

The typical population is characterized by the sculpture of elytra nearly smooth and with just visible foveae on the primary intervals. In the American Museum of Natural History in New York exist a pair of specimens that were captured in the state of Zacatecas about 250km to the north of the typical locality. These specimens have the same model of genitalia and their elytra are almost entirely smooth.

Examined specimens and literature’s data
Mexico. Jalisco: Huejotitan 1700m. (type.of C. depressicolle var. digueti, MNHN), Las Lagunillas N. Tepatitlan 1800m. (Häckel et Al., 2011: 56), Ajijic (UASM); Zacatecas: Laguna Balderama (= Valderrama) (AMNH), Tlatenango (UASM)

Notes: Brachypterous. It is nocturnal, and can be found from an altitude of 1600 to 3000m., in clearings of woodlands, where it is active in May and July-August (Erwin, 2007: 91).
The species is named after the French naturalist Léon Diguet (1859 –1926), that made many trips to Mexico collecting natural history specimens for the National Museum of Natural History in Paris.

Calosoma (Carabomimus) digueti
Lapouge, 1924
Mexique, env. Jalisco, Huejotitan 1700m, Diguet 1913
(lectotype) (coll. Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris)

Calosoma (Carabomimus) digueti
Lapouge, 1924
Mexique, Zacatecas, Laguna Balderama (Valderrama)
25ml W Fresnillo 6800ft, 21.VI.1954 H. Brewer lgt
(coll. American Museum of Natural History, New York)

Calosoma (Carabomimus) digueti colimaense Lassalle, 2009

Carabomimus digueti colimaensis, Lassalle, 2009: 6 (type: Jalisco, Nevado de Colima; coll. Lassalle)
Calosoma (Carabomimus) flohri colimaense, Häckel et Al., 2011: 54.
Carabomimus digueti mascotaensis, Lassalle & van den Berghe: 2011: 53 (type: Jalisco, Mascota; coll. Lassalle)

More South, always in Jalisco, Lassalle (2009: 6) has found a population, with the same model of genitalia of the typical one but a different sculpture of elytra with well visible intervals, which he described as C. digueti colimaense. According to Häckel & al. (2011: 54), this population should be referred to C. flohri as a subspecies, We think on the contrary, considering the unmistakable shape of apex of penis and lack of punctures on pronoun, that it can considered as valid subspecies including the more western population that Lassalle & van den Berghe (2011: 53), described later on as C. digueti mascotaensis, and that only differs for an even stronger elytral sculpture.

Examined specimens
Mexico. Jalisco: Nevado de Colima (paratype of colimaensis, SB), Mazamitla (sub C. flohri colimaense, Häckel et Al., 2011: 54), Mascota (paratype of mascotaensis, SB)

Notes: Brachypterous. It is nocturnal, and has been found from an altitude around 2000-2200m., in July.

Calosoma (Carabomimus) digueti colimaense
Lassalle, 2009 (paratype)
Mexico: South Eastern Jalisco, Mazamitla
2200m., VII.2009, ex coll. Lassalle


Calosoma (Carabomimus) digueti colimaense
Lassalle, 2009 (paratype of Carabomimus digueti mascotaensis, Lassalle & van den Berghe: 2011)
Mexico: Jalisco, Mascota, Juanacatlan 2000m, VII:2009 Lassalle lgt
Calosoma (Carabomimus) digueti colimaense
Lassalle, 2009 (paratype of Carabomimus digueti mascotaensis, Lassalle & van den Berghe: 2011)
Mexico: Jalisco, Mascota, Juanacatlan 2000m, VII:2009 Lassalle lgt

Calosoma (Carabomimus) digueti hoegei Breuning, 1928b

Calosoma (Blaptosoma) cicatricosum ssp. högei Breuning, 1928b: 53 (holotype: Mexique, Jalisco, Guadalajara; Naturalis Biodiversity Centre, Leiden)
Blaptosoma (Eutelodontum) cicatricosum högei Lapouge, 1932: 392
Carabomimus laevigatus ssp. högei Jeannel 1940: 226
Calosoma (Carabomimus) laevigatum hogei Gidaspow, 1959: 291
Calosoma (Carabomimus) laevigatum hoegei Erwin, 2007: 97
Carabomimus digueti hogei, Lassalle & van den Berghe, 2011: 51

Breuning (1928b: 53) described three female Carabomimus specimens from Guadalajara, which he considered a population of cicatricosum (cicatricosum hoegei). Jeannel (1940: 226) has attributed without discussion these specimens to C. laevigatum, stressing that they differ only in the lesser curvature of the sides of pronotum in its posterior third, apparently without regard to the original description, in which the elytral sculpture of hoegei is assimilated to the one of cicatricosum and therefore with the same conspicous foveae, though, in this case, with more regular alignement. He was followed in his opinion by Gidaspov (1959: 291), that also could not see the types, and by subsequent authors, up to the revision of Lassalle & van den Berghe (2011) that attribute hoegei to C. digueti as subspecies. Considered the many characteristics of the body shape that hoegei has in common with digueti and especially the unmistakable shape of the pronotum and of its hind angles, we think that this is the correct solution, at least temporarily, until we can know the shape of male genitalia.

Examined specimens
Mexico. Jalisco: Guadalajara (holotype, NBC)

Notes: Brachypterous. According to Erwin (2007: 91), specimens of hoegei would have been found near water, at an altitude around 1900m., in September.
The species has been named after Carl Friedrich Höge (1834-1908), a Hamburg famous photographer and an insect dealer who traveled to Mexico several times in the late 1800s.

Calosoma (Carabomimus) digueti högei
Breuning, 1928b
Mexique, Jalisco, Guadalajara (type)
(coll. Zoölogisch Museum, Universiteit van Amsterdam)
(photo B. Lassalle)

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